THE WORLD AFTER COVID 19

COVID-19 infected hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The pandemic has also caused significant damage to global and regional governing political structures, necessitating a reconsideration of their own raison d'ĂȘtre. The global economic fallout has also been unprecedented, with major disruptions in the flow of goods and people, as well as lockdowns in the transportation, services, and retail industries, among others. Three realities must be genuinely addressed to build a post-COVID-19 order that is adequately prepared to deal with the next global crisis, as well as those that have been ongoing for decades. First, the previously held belief that global crises and problems are addressed through local responses must be abandoned. Second, the COVID-19 pandemic has reminded us of the importance of (re)investing in basic, perhaps naive and simple, public health functions like sanitation, as well as transparent national and global health monitoring. Third, the pandemic serves as a stark reminder to abandon the mantra that privatisation of the healthcare delivery system is the solution, in favour of viewing health as a public good that must be managed and executed by the state and its public sector, whether national, sub-regional, or local. We must learn from the pandemic to strengthen our societies. The pandemic has also caused significant damage to global and regional governing political structures, necessitating a reconsideration of their raison d'ĂȘtre and mode of operation (or lack thereof). The global economic fallout will also be unprecedented, as goods and people flows have been severely disrupted, and lockdowns have hit the transportation, services, and retail industries, among others. Many people around the world have speculated in recent years about the impact of rising nationalism on the formation of a new world order. COVID-19 demonstrated how nationalism can lead to the dissolution of decade-long alliances based on shared values and interests. The question now is whether the world will support and continue with the nationalism theme after COVID-19, or whether the balance will shift toward placing more value on globalist approaches and values, beginning with better global health. The pandemic is a clear reminder to abandon the mantra that privatisation of the healthcare delivery system is the solution in favour of viewing health as a public good that must be managed and executed by the state and its public sector, whether national, sub-regional, or local. The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the importance of the "health for all" approach, which sees health as a public good. As a result, the population of every single country affected by COVID-19 expected the state to take care of them, from testing, containment, and healthcare provision to relocating citizens. The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the importance of the "health for all" approach, which sees health as a public good. As a result, the population of every single country affected by COVID-19 expected the state to take care of them, from testing, containment, and healthcare provision to relocating citizens. This was true even in countries where the dominant culture and philosophy valued minimal state intervention in all aspects of life. COVID-19 will alter our perceptions of the state's role and responsibilities.COVID-19 is not the first global crisis that humanity has faced, nor will it be the last. At the moment, the critical issue is to learn from this pandemic and advance our societies to become stronger and more just, something that the world has not prioritised in recent decades. This could be a wake-up call.

Post a Comment

0 Comments